Meet me in New Orleans at the IEEE EMC+SIPI Symposium, 22-26 July 2019

18 Mar 2019

Author: EMC Standards

Keith’s seven presentations in the tutorial and workshop sessions
of the IEEE EMC+SIPI Symposium, New Orleans, USA, 22-26 July 2019, www.emc2019.emcss.org

Monday 22nd July, 08:30 – 10:00

Risk Management of EM Disturbances – Introduction to IEEE P1848 and the need for it — with Professor Davy Pissoort of the Mechatronics Lab, KU Leuven, Bruges, Belgium

IEEE P1848 is a development of the IET’s 2017 Code of Practice on Electromagnetic Resilience, and this tutorial applies equally well to both.

This tutorial is extended on the Thursday afternoon, when Keith and Davy will describe P1848’s practical techniques and measures in some detail.

Tuesday 23rd July, 08:30 – 10:00

Who’s afraid of the Big Bad RED? — with an RED Notified Body (name TBD)

RED stands for Radio Equipment Directive, and if your product includes any wireless datacoms at all (e.g. even just a little Bluetooth, WiFi, GSM, ZigBee, LoRa, etc., module) then for all ‘supply’ in the EU it now comes under the jurisdiction of the RED instead of under the EMC and LVD Directives!

Its EMC and LVD compliance must now be dealt with via an EU Declaration of Conformity to the RED instead, but unfortunately – of the many hundreds of EMC and LVD standards listed under the EMC and LV Directives – only a very few are listed under the RED and there is no prospect of this situation changing for a year or more.

The almost total lack of EMC and LVD standards harmonized under the RED is confusing many manufacturers whose approach to EU compliance has been to declare conformity to each Directive by listing the relevant harmonised standards under that Directive on their EU Declaration of Conformity.

So, the main aim of this discussion meeting is to show that this situation can in fact be easily managed without (usually!) having to spend any more on LVD testing, and without (usually!) having to spend very much more on EMC testing.

Wednesday 24th July, 13:30 – 17:00

Part of the workshop on Introduction to Medical EMC

Risk Management of EMI for Medical Devices

IEC 60601-1-2:2007 and 2014 both require EMI to be risk managed to achieve Essential Performance as specified by IEC 60601-1 and ISO 14971.

But their Normative texts are only about EMC testing and it is well-known (or should be by now!) that it is impossible to prove that any modern digital system is safe enough by testing alone.

Keith’s contribution to this workshop is to provide practical guidance on how to prove that modern medical devices actually do achieve Essential Performance, and to introduce the new IEC/TR standard being proposed on this very important safety requirement.

Thursday 25th July, 13:30 – 17:00

Risk Management of EM Disturbances and Its Associated Standard
– Details of the Techniques and Measures Employed
— with Professor Davy Pissoort of the Mechatronics Lab, KU Leuven, Bruges, Belgium

This extends Keith and Davy’s Monday morning tutorial by describing the practical techniques and measures in some detail.

The ‘Associated Standard’ in the title is IEEE P1848, which is a development of the IET’s 2017 Code of Practice on Electromagnetic Resilience, and this workshop applies equally well to both.

Friday 26th July, 13:30 – 17:00

Part of the workshop on Estimating work level in EM mitigation

Win-Win Methods for Quoting EMC Consultancy,
When (as usual) We Don’t Know the Length of the Piece of String

Friday 26th July, 13:30 – 17:00

Both the below are part of the workshop on Practical EMC Training and Education

A Proven Effective EMC Lab Experiment for Masters’ Students,
based upon laying out a Printed Circuit Board and Testing its EMC
— with Professor Davy Pissoort of the Mechatronics Lab, KU Leuven, Bruges, Belgium

This describes and demonstrates a new “EMC Demo Box” that was recently developed from Keith’s famous demo box and which has several advantages for teaching students about EMC.

A Well-Proven Approach for De-Risking SI, PI and EMC in Projects

Yes, it is now perfectly feasible to de-risk projects as regards signal integrity, power integrity and EMC at a very early stage, without using simulators or field solvers.

The approach is very well proven to reduce development times and costs (including minimising the use of EMC laboratory testing) but it is not yet as widely known as it should be.

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