EMC for the Functional Safety of Automobiles Why EMC Testing is Insufficient, and What is Necessary

EMC for the Functional Safety of Automobiles Why EMC Testing is Insufficient, and What is Necessary image #1
Abstract 
 
‘Functional safety’ means the achievement of acceptable risks due to operational (functional) errors or malfunctions over the anticipated lifetime of a product.
Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC) is validated by testing product characteristics using standardised test methods in an EMC laboratory. There have long been concerns [1] that this is inadequate for functional safety. In all safety-engineering disciplines it is considered insufficient to rely totally on product testing. Instead, acceptable safety risks are validated using a variety of methods (including, but not limited to testing) to verify the safety design.
 
Part II of this paper describes twelve reasons why traditional EMC testing is insufficient as the sole means of demonstrating the necessary EM characteristics for functional safety.
 
Part III describes what EM engineering and verification techniques
are required, where errors or malfunctions in electronics (hardware and firmware) could impact functional safety.

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